Vertragen alternde europäische Sozialstaaten Massenzuwanderung?

Essay von Prof. Dr. Erich Weede,
Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

Erstveröffentlichung in
Orientierungen zur Wirtschafts- und Gesellschaftspolitik
Ludwig Erhard Stiftung e.V.

Vertragen die alternden europäischen Sozialstaaten die Massenzuwanderung, die wir haben?

Professor Erich Weede sieht große Gefahren im anhaltenden Zustrom von Migranten nach Deutschland und Europa sowie in der „mangelnden Bereitschaft, über langfristige Probleme und Herausforderungen auch nur nachzudenken“. Letztlich sei zu befürchten, „dass die Kombination von Sozialstaat und aus humanitären Gründen offenen Grenzen die Zukunft Deutschlands und Europas erheblich belasten wird“.

Zuwanderung als Chance oder als Problem

Deutschland ist ein alterndes Land. Der Anteil der Menschen im arbeitsfähigen Alter sinkt, der Anteil der Menschen, die Renten oder Pensionen beziehen, steigt. Da liegt es nahe, mithilfe von Ausländern, die bei uns einwandern, die demografische Lücke zu schließen. Gleichzeitig wollen immer mehr Menschen nach Deutsch- land kommen: aus den armen Ländern Afrikas, aus Bürgerkriegsländern des Nahen und Mittleren Ostens, aber auch aus den Balkanländern, wo viele Menschen die Hoffnung auf einen Arbeitsplatz und die Aussicht auf auch nur bescheidenen Wohlstand aufgegeben haben. Optimisten neigen in dieser Situation dazu, auf eine Komplementarität der deutschen und der genannten ausländischen Bedürfnisse zu schließen. Deutschland öffnet seine Grenzen für Asylanten, Bürgerkriegsflüchtlinge und Menschen, die Armut und Hoffnungslosigkeit entkommen wollen. Zuwanderer und Gastland gewinnen. Die Welt wird besser. Das Asylrecht ist dann ein Instrument zur Verbesserung der Welt. Weil die Folgen dieses Rechts für die eigene Gesellschaft nie durchdacht worden sind oder man implizit immer nur niedrige Bewerberzahlen unterstellt hat, kann man es auch als „Asylbewerberrecht“ oder „Schönwetterrecht“ bezeichnen …

Lesen sie den gesamten Beitrag hier ->
Erich Weede (PDF, 145 kb)

The return of Marx and Lenin

GIS statement by Prince Michael of Liechtenstein

Vladimir Lenin, Russia’s Communist revolutionary, famously observed that the “best way to destroy the capitalist system is to debauch the currency.” Indeed, monetary instability wreaks havoc with the markets and breaks down social classes. It destroys the savings of the middle class in particular. The myth that recessions and overheating can be prevented by central banks and that cheap money stimulates consumption and investment, thus boosting the economy, has led to low to negative interest rate policies in many countries. In reality, this policy causes speculative bubbles and crashes, destroys savings and strains the affected countries’ social fabric.

Lenin-the-return

One crucial component of the Marxist-Leninist prescription for the West’s demise has thus been implemented. There is another one at work in today’s economy.

Savings endow their owners with freedom of choice. They also inspire healthy pride and self-confidence. Debts, on the other hand, limit one’s freedom, as third parties, the creditors, have their say.

This loss of freedom in a debt-driven society increases dependence on public welfare, especially in retirement. The IMF and some central banks, including Germany’s Bundesbank, now want to accelerate this alarming “socialization” process by proposing to confiscate a considerable share of citizens’ savings in order to cover government debt.

These “monetarist” interventions in the economy are amplified by overregulation and a mania for control. A combination of ever-growing government debt, an elimination of the incentives to save and an empowered bureaucracy is putting Western countries on a path to becoming planned economies.

‘The way to crush the bourgeoisie is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation’

Once the currency is debased, savings taken away, property rights weakened to a point where they remain only on paper, a Marxist-Leninist “socialization” of the means of production is practically accomplished. It is worth noting how smugly the current talk of abolishing cash in favour of electronic accounts fits into the scheme of total state control.

Another important principle of the Leninist state was, “trust is good, control is better” (as a matter of fact, trust was utterly absent in the old Soviet Union). Today, citizens of Western democracies are subjected to ever-expanding, all-encompassing registration and monitoring. Tax systems are becoming more complex, which justifies additional layers of supervision. Personal finances are scrutinized under pretexts ranging from tax compliance to fighting terrorism, and private payments must be accounted for.

An excessive exchange of data to and between authorities has become the rule and this erosion of privacy meets little resistance. Lenin called those in the West who unwittingly helped the Communists’ cynical agenda “useful idiots”; nowadays, these are people who say to themselves, “I am honest, I have nothing to hide, and therefore I do not object to such controls.”

One thing is certain: the data will be misused, freedom further restricted. Lenin put it succinctly: “The way to crush the bourgeoisie is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation.”

A free society can only grow based on freedom of choice and trust. In the early 1990s, the bankrupt and thoroughly compromised Soviet system left the scene. Incredibly now, the policies of the West’s leading central banks and governments are working to resurrect it under a different name.

When the newly born Soviet state needed Western technologies, Lenin was quoted as saying the “capitalists will sell us the rope with which we will hang them.” Nearly a century later, it looks like Western democracies are procuring the rope – and hanging themselves.

Read the original GIS statement here ->
The return of Marx and Lenin


*GIS is a global intelligence service providing independent, analytical, fact-based reports from a team of experts around the world. We also provide bespoke geopolitical consultancy services to businesses to support their international investment decisions. Our clients have access to expert insights in the fields of geopolitics, economics, defence, security and energy. Our experts provide scenarios on significant geopolitical events and trends. They use their knowledge to analyse the big picture and provide valuable recommendations of what is likely to happen next, in a way which informs long-term decision-making. Our experts play active roles in top universities, think-tanks, intelligence services, business and as government advisors. They have a unique blend of backgrounds and experience to deliver the narrative and understanding of global developments. They will help you develop a complete understanding of international affairs because they identify the key players, their motivations and what really matters in a changing world. Our experts examine the challenges and opportunities in economies old and new, identify emerging politicians and analyse and appraise new threats in a fast-changing world. They offer new ideas, fresh perspectives and rigorous study.

Making Lemonade out of Brexit Lemons

GIS Statement by Prince Michael of Liechtenstein

brexit-shock

Doom and gloom! Voters in the United Kingdom have decided to leave the European Union. Markets are tumbling, Prime Minister David Cameron has announced his resignation and politicians around the globe have expressed deep worry.

Leaders of the various EU countries, as well as those in Brussels, have voiced their regret and warned of Brexit’s dangers. Some have also pointed to damaging consequences for the UK, sounding very much as if they are making threats.

Prime Minister Cameron has been criticized for initiating the referendum. However, the vote was necessary to clarify the UK’s position in the bloc. Holding it took courage on his part.

The next move for the UK is to formally notify Brussels of its intention to leave the EU; the exit would become effective after a statutory period of two years. For the time being, the UK is still a member of the bloc. Notification does not have to be issued immediately.

The UK is an important trading partner for the rest of the EU. It is therefore in the interest of both sides to reach free trade and other agreements over the next two years. This should be feasible, assuming both sides go about the negotiations pragmatically.

Risks and opportunities

The largest danger is overreaction by the EU and the remaining members. This includes any attempt to make an example out of the UK with some sort of retaliatory “punishment.” Motivation for such a move comes from hypocritical self-righteousness, opposition to reform and centralizers’ fear that other members might follow the UK’s lead.

But the vote offers the opportunity to make reforms, such as increasing subsidiarity (where the EU performs only those tasks that cannot be performed at a more local level) and encouraging competition between members to improve efficiency. This would mean going back to a simple system that grants the four basic EU freedoms (the free movement of goods, services, people and capital).

‘The most important reform the EU should make is discontinuing the transfer union'

The most important reform the EU should make is to discontinue the transfer union – by which financial transfers are made from richer to poorer regions. Short-term transfer payments can make sense to develop certain regions, but a permanent transfer system is self-destructive. GIS warned of this more than a year ago, when observing that Europe was accepting Brexit in order to avoid Grexit.

But it is not Brexit that endangers EU cohesion. Instead, it is the transfer union and an exaggeration of so-called “solidarity.” Any over-generous solidarity will be misused.

Hopeful developments

Looking at the gloomy post-Brexit news is depressing, full of predictions of disaster. But this overshadows a lot of good news. Colombia has finally achieved what appears to be a robust peace agreement in a bloody terrorism-infused civil war that lasted decades. The Panama Canal expansion has been completed, which should give an enormous boost to global trade.

So Europe should not paralyze itself in a hysteria of whining, but grasp the opportunities. The referendum and its long-term outcome, despite the immediate result, could yet prove to be a net positive.

Read the original GIS statement here ->
Make Lemonade out of Brexit Lemons


*GIS is a global intelligence service providing independent, analytical, fact-based reports from a team of experts around the world. We also provide bespoke geopolitical consultancy services to businesses to support their international investment decisions. Our clients have access to expert insights in the fields of geopolitics, economics, defence, security and energy. Our experts provide scenarios on significant geopolitical events and trends. They use their knowledge to analyse the big picture and provide valuable recommendations of what is likely to happen next, in a way which informs long-term decision-making. Our experts play active roles in top universities, think-tanks, intelligence services, business and as government advisors. They have a unique blend of backgrounds and experience to deliver the narrative and understanding of global developments. They will help you develop a complete understanding of international affairs because they identify the key players, their motivations and what really matters in a changing world. Our experts examine the challenges and opportunities in economies old and new, identify emerging politicians and analyse and appraise new threats in a fast-changing world. They offer new ideas, fresh perspectives and rigorous study.

Semantic Traps: Distorting Debates Through Definitions

Daniel Issing – blog author at studentsforliberty.org – reflects on the seminar ‘Semantic Traps: Politics with Loaded Terms’. It was held on June 9-11, 2016 in Vaduz (FL).

Every libertarian is well aware of the odd name defenders of individual freedom use to label their position nowadays. In fact, the word “libertarianism” is a fairly new creation, emerging in the second half of the last century. It was coined to distinguish this position from those who call themselves “liberal”, a word that once represented a commitment to laissez faire and free markets. Today, however, it means the very opposite and is more akin to the socialist position. The redefinition of terms for political purposes was a very successful marketing coup by social democrats, particularly in the United States.

Is it possible to win arguments in the political arena by simply using words that are either so vague that we cannot assign a precise meaning to them or are systematically misleading? To what extent can the parties to the debate gain an advantage by confusing their opponents through their use of words? Is the progressive corruption of our language a threat to civil liberties? These and other question formed the starting point of a seminar aptly named “Semantic Traps: Politics with Loaded Terms”, which was co-organized by ECAEF, PERC and LAF. Thanks to Kurt Leube – program’s Academic Director and a very eager and generous supporter of ESFL – I was invited to participate in what turned out to be an extremely insightful weekend. But let us start from the beginning …

Read the full article here ->
Semantic Traps

Rose Wilder Lane – Die Freiheit finden

Beitrag von eigentümlich frei*, 22. Juni 2016

Albanologinnen und Albanologen kennen sie. Die anderen nicht. Dabei war Rose Wilder Lane (1886-1968) für den US-amerikanischen Liberalismus mindestens so wichtig wie Ayn Rand. Denn Wilder Lane kannte die Sowjetunion. Und sie kannte Europa. Und beides gefiel ihr nicht. Das ist vielleicht übertrieben. In Europa lernte sie einen Flecken kennen, der sie überzeugte. Nordalbanien. Sie besuchte die Region nämlich in den 20er Jahren und lernte die Gesellschaft in den Bergen schätzen. Die dortigen Stämme wehrten sich mit allen Mitteln gegen den aufblühenden Zentralstaat. Die Bergstämme kämpften auch gegen andere erfundene Königreiche wie Montenegro und Jugoslawien an. Sie wollten in Ruhe gelassen werden. Das war auch Wilder Lanes Philosophie. „Menschen sollen sich befreien.“

Befreiung der Frau

Gary Stanley BeckerFreilich liebte Wilder Lane viele Aspekte der albanischen Stammesgesellschaft nicht. Doch sie liebte auch viele Aspekte ihrer heimischen Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika nicht. Sie war eine glühende Verfechterin der Gleichberechtigung aller Menschen. Kein Wunder; die Scheidung von ihrem Ehemann erfolgte, weil sie eine viel erfolgreichere Journalistin war als er.
Aber gerade weil sie kompromisslos für Gleichberechtigung eintrat, lehnte sie Feminismus und dergleichen ab. Die politische Auseinandersetzung in den USA der 30er Jahre war nämlich: Sollen spezielle Förderprogramme für Frauen und Schwarze initiiert werden? Sollen diese zwei Gruppen besondere Geldleistungen des Staates erhalten? Roosevelts New Deal hat gerade das gebracht. Wilder Lane war dagegen.
Sie meinte nämlich, es sei keine echte Befreiung, wenn man vom Staat abhängig gemacht würde. „Der Sozialstaat ist viel unterdrückender als der schlimmste Sklavenhalter: Er nimmt einem auch die Würde weg.“ Solange man Menschen in abstrakten Klassen wie weiß, schwarz, Mann, Frau, reich, arm, Masse und so weiter kategorisiert, sind sie nicht frei.

Befreiung der Menschen

Dieser Punkt gilt ganz generell. Sobald sich Menschen vom Staat das Leben vorschreiben lassen, sind sie nicht mehr frei. Wenn man aber zum Bettler gemacht wird, verliert man seine Würde. Mehr noch, man gefährdet alle anderen auch. „Subventionen und Sozialhilfe sind riesige Pyramidenschemen, die den politischen Erfolg eines Menschen auf Kosten der künftigen Generationen sichern.“ Auch hier wird die Kritik am New Deal deutlich.
Ihre Sozialversicherungskarte schickte Wilder Lane zurück. Den Bons für rationierte Lebensmittel – das war in den USA während des Zweiten Weltkriegs und danach normal – verweigerte sie die Annahme. Um die Gründe dieses Ungehorsams zu überprüfen, schickte das FBI sogar einen Polizistin zu Wilder Lane ins Haus. Sie soll den Beamten gefragt haben: „Sind Sie von der Gestapo?“
Für Wilder Lane war es klar: Jede und jeder muss das Leben selbst in die Hand nehmen. Sie trat beispielsweise einer Genossenschaft bei. Die vom Staat rationierten Lebensmittel hatte diese freiwillige Vereinigung im Überfluss. Obschon Wilder Lane eine beliebte – und auch reiche – Romanautorin war, fing sie an, weniger zu arbeiten. Sie wollte nämlich nicht mehr so viel verdienen, um auch weniger Einkommenssteuer zu bezahlen. Sie wollte nämlich nicht für den kriegstreibenden Sozialstaat aufkommen.

Befreiung des Geistes

Die gelernte Telegrafikerin, spätere Journalistin, gefeierte Romanautorin reiste ihr Leben lang. Sie zog durch die USA und wohnte in verschiedenen Staaten. Sie besuchte Europa. Sie diente sogar in der Sowjetunion für das Rote Kreuz. Auch wenn sie immer freiheitlich inspiriert war, wurde sie erst in den 1920ern zur überzeugten Liberalen. Im Jahr 1943 publizierte sie ihr philosophisches Buch „The Discovery of Freedom“. Im gleichen Jahr erschienen Ayn Rands „The Fountainhead“ und Isabel Patersons „The God of the Machine“. Für viele US-amerikanische Liberale – Libertäre, wie sie sich nennen – markiert deswegen das Jahr 1943 die Geburt ihrer Bewegung.
Doch Wilder Lane war alles andere als eine Bücher schreibende, Gemüse pflückende Intellektuelle. Nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg widmete sie sich ganz der liberalen Bewegung in den USA. Ihre Devise war: „Die USA dürfen nicht sozialistisch werden.“ Sie reiste, hielt Vorträge, baute Personen und Parteien auf. Sie ließ keine Ruhe. Denn von den albanischen Stämmen hatte sie gelernt: Wenn man etwas will, muss man dafür kämpfen; und wenn man es nicht will, auch.

© 2016 Lichtschlag Medien und Werbung KG


*: eigentümlich frei (ef) ist eine seit 1998 erscheinende politische Monatsschrift mit zehn Ausgaben pro Jahr.[1] Ihre Positionen bezeichnet Herausgeber und Chefredakteur André F. Lichtschlag als individualistisch, kapitalistisch und libertär. Politikwissenschaftler sehen in der Zeitschrift weltanschauliche und personelle Überschneidungen mit der Neuen Rechten.